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How breast enlargement or reduction affects breastfeeding


The breast of women does not only have a function of nutrition to our babies, but it is an important part of the erotic and of the feminine identity. For this reason, there are not a few women who go under the knife to retouch that part of their body, both to increase and reduce size. Today we are going to banish some myths that link breast surgery with breastfeeding.

1. If I wear a silicone prosthesis, I will not be able to breastfeed. This statement is false in most cases, since currently the techniques used do not alter the shape of the nipple, do not touch glandular tissue and the prostheses are usually placed behind the pectoral muscle.

However, there are times when the incision is made through the areola, here if there may be problems in the baby's grip if the woman heals poorly, and makes a keloid (thickening of the scar). In addition, some study suggests that this approach technique could increase the risk of mastitis, because the milk ducts (through which the milk comes out) can be damaged.

2. Silicone harms the baby. Studies reveal that silicone is safe for breastfeeding, and that no substance passes from the prosthesis into breast milk.

3. It is more difficult to breastfeed after a breast reduction. Generally, yes, since in this type of surgery excess fat is removed and glandular tissue is often carried ahead, the ducts through which the milk has to flow to the outside are affected, and many times the scars prevent or make it very difficult to lactation.

However successful breastfeeding it will depend a lot on the technique used by the surgeon, and largely on the amount of tissue you have to remove. In addition, many times, the breasts, when operating on them, the areola is also modified and cut so that it is aesthetically harmonious with the new size.

In any case, the consequences that a breast reduction operation and breastfeeding are going to have, can only be assessed at the moment of initiation of breastfeeding; and there is nothing we can do to prevent or improve the baby's latch.

It is very important that women who have undergone breast surgery have the support and advice from professionals, such as midwives, and that they attend breastfeeding support groups.

You can read more articles similar to How breast enlargement or reduction affects breastfeeding, in the category of On-site breastfeeding.